Information and communication technologies

Here are Accessibility Standards Canada’s standards and funded grants and contributions research related to information and communication technologies. Check here often for new information related to this priority area.

Standards

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CAN/ASC - EN 301 549:2024 - Accessibility requirements for ICT products and services (EN 301 549:2021, IDT)

CAN/ASC - EN 301 549:2024 - Accessibility requirements for ICT products and services (EN 301 549:2021, IDT)

Areas of focus

There are common areas where people with disabilities may experience barriers to accessibility in information and communication technology products and services. These include, but are not limited to: 

  • websites
  • software
  • electronic devices
  • mobile apps

The technical Committee on Accessibility Requirements for Information and Communication Technology Products and Services will work towards the adoption in its entirety of the European harmonized standard “EN 301 549, Accessibility requirements for ICT products and services”. The adoption of this standard represents a fundamental step in accessible Canadian procurement advancement.

This standard is in development

  • This draft standard is intended to provide preliminary information to help government departments and federally regulated entities as they continue their journey to improve accessibility in the area of employment.  
  • This draft standard is no longer open for public comment. The public review period took place from December 20, 2023 to February 5, 2024.  
  • This draft standard will be replaced by the final standard once the standards development process is complete. The final standard is expected in Spring 2024.

Technical committee members

Jutta Treviranus (Chairperson), Director, Professor, Inclusive Design Research Center, OCAD University

Abishek Gupta, ML Engineer, RAI Researcher, Founder, Principal Researcher, Montreal AI Ethics Institute, Boston Consulting Group (BCG), BCG Henderson Institute

Alison Paprica, Professor (adjunct) and Senior Fellow, Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto

Anne Jackson, Professor, Seneca College

Clayton Lewis, Professor, University of Colorado

Gary Birch, Executive Director, Neil Squire Society

John Weigelt, CTO Microsoft Canada, Microsoft Canada

John Willis, Senior Advisor, Centre of Excellence for Human Rights & Employee Experience, Ontario Public Service 

Julia Stoyanovich, Associate Professor, Director, Tandon School of Engineering NYU

Julianna Rowsell, Senior Product Manager, Product Equity, Adobe

Kate Kalcevich, Head of Accessibility Innovation, Fable

Kave Noori, Artificial Intelligence Policy Officer, European Disability Forum

Lisa Liskovoi, Senior Inclusive Designer and Digital Accessibility Specialist, Inclusive Design Research Center, OCAD University

Lisa Snider, Access Changes Everything

Luna Bengio, Accessibility Consultant and Strategic Advisor

Merve Hickok, Founder, President and Research Director, Aiethicist.org Center for AI and Digital Policy, University of Michigan

Mia Ahlgren, Human Rights and Disability Officer, Swedish Disability Rights Federation

Nancy McLaughlin, Senior Policy Advisor on Accessibility, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Saeid Molladavoudi, Senior Data Science Advisor, Statistics Canada

Sambhavi Chandrashekar, Global Accessibility Lead, D2L Corporation

CAN-ASC-6.2 Accessible and Equitable Artificial Intelligence Systems

CAN-ASC-6.2 Accessible and Equitable Artificial Intelligence Systems

Areas of focus

There are common areas where people with disabilities may experience barriers to accessibility in artificial intelligence systems. These include, but are not limited to:

  • being excluded from a system’s:
    • design and development
    • implementation and use
    • evaluation and improvement
  • not being able to access a system due to their disability
  • lack of privacy regarding their disability data 
  • bias in the system’s statistical reasoning 
  • unfair outcomes
  • no mechanism for challenging automated decisions
  • ethical oversight that is not clear or transparent

This standard is in development

Standard started November 10, 2023

Public review expected in winter 2026

Publication expected in spring 2027

Technical committee members

Jutta Treviranus (Chairperson), Director, Professor, Inclusive Design Research Center, OCAD University

Abishek Gupta, ML Engineer, RAI Researcher, Founder, Principal Researcher, Montreal AI Ethics Institute, Boston Consulting Group (BCG), BCG Henderson Institute

Alison Paprica, Professor (adjunct) and Senior Fellow, Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto

Anne Jackson, Professor, Seneca College

Clayton Lewis, Professor, University of Colorado

Gary Birch, Executive Director, Neil Squire Society

John Weigelt, CTO Microsoft Canada, Microsoft Canada

John Willis, Senior Advisor, Centre of Excellence for Human Rights & Employee Experience, Ontario Public Service 

Julia Stoyanovich, Associate Professor, Director, Tandon School of Engineering NYU

Julianna Rowsell, Senior Product Manager, Product Equity, Adobe

Kate Kalcevich, Head of Accessibility Innovation, Fable

Kave Noori, Artificial Intelligence Policy Officer, European Disability Forum

Lisa Liskovoi, Senior Inclusive Designer and Digital Accessibility Specialist, Inclusive Design Research Center, OCAD University

Lisa Snider, Access Changes Everything

Luna Bengio, Accessibility Consultant and Strategic Advisor

Merve Hickok, Founder, President and Research Director, Aiethicist.org Center for AI and Digital Policy, University of Michigan

Mia Ahlgren, Human Rights and Disability Officer, Swedish Disability Rights Federation

Nancy McLaughlin, Senior Policy Advisor on Accessibility, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

Saeid Molladavoudi, Senior Data Science Advisor, Statistics Canada

Sambhavi Chandrashekar, Global Accessibility Lead, D2L Corporation

Grants and Contributions Research

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Future of Work and Disability

Future of Work and Disability

This research project is completed.

Who is leading the research?

Inclusive Design Research Centre - Ontario College of Art and Design University

What is the goal of this study?

This study will look at how artificial intelligence and other technologies affect people with disabilities. The goal is to determine whether these technologies limit or improve their employment opportunities and well-being.

Why does this study matter?

The use of artificial intelligence in employment processes is increasing. The impact of this on people with disabilities needs to be studied. This will ensure everyone is treated equally. It will also ensure that people with disabilities are not excluded from the process as an unintended consequence.

What are the key findings?

  • Artificial intelligence cannot overcome certain employment barriers. These include job applications that are not accessible. It also includes systems that do not value the skills of people with disabilities.
  • Artificial intelligence could support inclusion by removing hiring barriers. Adaptive technologies that are based on artificial intelligence can be used to support people with disabilities. Data can be used to “train” artificial intelligence to recognize and support diversity.

Artificial intelligence can support inclusion. However, it cannot overcome attitudinal barriers. These continue to be the greatest barrier to employment for people with disabilities.

 If you would like a full copy of the report, please email us.

Web accessibility of Canadian banking/financial services

Web accessibility of Canadian banking/financial services

This research project is complete.

Who is leading the research?

Regroupement des aveugles et amblyopes du Québec (RAAQ)

What is the goal of this study?

This study will look at the online services that Quebec’s financial institutions offer through their websites. It will gather information on any barriers that people with disabilities face when accessing and using these services. The goal will be to develop best practices for providing online services that are accessible to all clients.

Why does this study matter?

The banking sector continues to innovate and expand its online presence. It is important that accessibility needs are considered so that online banking services are available to everyone.

What are the key findings?

  • Most banks have accessibility policies. 
  • Researchers tested the accessibility of online platforms. The testing showed there are many easy changes that can be made to improve accessibility.
  • Some platforms use interactive components that are not programmed for accessibility. Having people with disabilities test these aspects could help identify barriers and improve accessibility.

If you would like a full copy of the report, please email us.

Informing Standards for Acoustics and the Built Environment

Informing Standards for Acoustics and the Built Environment 

This research project is completed.

Who is leading this research?

Carleton University

What is the goal of this study?

This study will look at the impact of the acoustic environment on people with disabilities. It will explore ways to reduce noise. It will also examine assistive listening technologies. The goal is to contribute to the removal and prevention of acoustics barriers.

Why does this study matter?

Finding the right balance between the built environment and assistive listening devices is important. This will improve access and increase the comfort of people with disabilities.

What are the key findings?

  • Acoustics are the effects of sounds in a building. Better technology and acoustics can reduce distracting and harmful noise. They can also improve the sounds we want to hear. 
  • Acoustics impact how people with disabilities interact with an environment. Construction materials and room shapes can affect acoustics. They can make it easier for people with disabilities to be in and move around a space.
  • It is easier to design a building or space with acoustics in mind rather than trying to fix it later.

“Sound and noise can impact the experiences of people with different types of disabilities.”

If you would like a full copy of the report, please email us.

Developing Recommendations for the Standardization of Wayfinding Technologies

Developing Recommendations for the Standardization of Wayfinding Technologies

This research project is completed.

Who is leading the research?

University Health Network

What is the goal of this study?

This study will review existing wayfinding technologies. It will also look at the barriers faced by people with disabilities in using these technologies. The goal of this study is to inform future wayfinding standards. 

Why does this study matter?

Wayfinding technologies guide people through the built environment. It is important to ensure they are accessible to people with all types of disabilities.

What are the key findings?

  • New technologies can help guide people with disabilities through unfamiliar environments. This can enable them to move around spaces safely and confidently.
  • It is important for these technologies to provide enough good-quality information to help people find their way. People should also be able to change the settings to suit their needs and interact with the tool. For example, they could allow them to save or transfer information to another device.
  • Technologies that are similar need to be built and used in the same way. People with disabilities should be able to rely on such technologies to find their way regardless of the environment. 

“It is important for people with disabilities to be able to find their way on their own in different environments.”

If you would like a full copy of the report, please email us.

The Future of Work: Equitable Digital Systems

The Future of Work: Equitable Digital Systems

This research project is completed.

Who is leading this research?

Inclusive Design Research Centre - Ontario College of Art and Design University

What is the goal of this study?

This study will review the digital tools and software used in federally regulated workplaces that present barriers to employees with disabilities.

Why does this study matter?

These tools need to be accessible to improve employment opportunities for people with all types of disabilities.

What are the key findings?

 
  • When software and other digital tools are introduced in the workplace, people with disabilities need to be able to access them. Ensuring such access should be a priority.
  • Every employee should have access to and know how to use communications systems that support people with disabilities.
  • When considering the purchase of new digital tools and services, it is important for employers to prioritize accessibility.

“For people with disabilities to be successful at work, it is important for them to have access to digital tools.”

If you would like a full copy of the report, please email us.

Usability of Digital Information and Information Technology for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Usability of Digital Information and Information Technology for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

This research project is completed.

Who is leading the research?

Surrey Place

What is the goal of this study?

People with disabilities face barriers when accessing and participating in the digital world. This study will make recommendations on accessibility standards for information and communication technologies. The goal is to remove barriers for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. 

Why does this study matter?

The digital world is becoming increasingly integrated with our daily lives. Technologies are needed to ensure people with intellectual and developmental disabilities can access that world. 

What are the key findings?

Guidelines must be written in plain language and provided in accessible formats.

  • Cognitive disability is a broad category. 
  • People with intellectual and developmental disabilities often have multiple disabilities. The current guidelines need to reflect that fact.

If you would like a full copy of the report, please email us.

Research and Inform Standards for Next-Generation 911

Research and Inform Standards for Next-Generation 911

This research project is completed.

Who is leading the research?

Neil Squire Society

What is the goal of this study?

This study will review emerging technologies that enable accessible communication. This information will be used to optimize the accessibility of the upcoming Next-generation 911. (Next-generation 911 is to integrate new services that will allow users to send and receive text, photos, and video as well as make voice calls from mobile devices.)

Why does this study matter?

Next-Generation 911 needs to be accessible to people with all types of disabilities.

What are the key findings?

  • There are many options for integrating emerging technologies to make Next-generation 911 services more accessible.
  • All new 911 services require an education and outreach program. This will ensure more people know about these services and how to use them.
  • To improve accessibility, the new 911 services should be consistent across the country. Also, when using a mobile device to communicate with 911 services, there should be no charge for data usage.

Researchers surveyed 493 people with disabilities. The results indicate they would prefer a 911 service that combines live video with a phone call. 

If you would like a full copy of the report, please email us

Developing Recommendations and Guidelines for Augmentative and Alternative Communication to Enable Persons with Motor, Communication, and Speech Impairment to Participate in Employment

Developing Recommendations and Guidelines for Augmentative and Alternative Communication to Enable Persons with Motor, Communication, and Speech Impairment to Participate in Employment

 

This research project is completed.

Who is leading this research?

Queen’s University

What is the goal of this study?

Augmentative and alternative communication devices make it possible to communicate in ways other than speech. The goal of this study is to determine the requirements for such devices to enable people with motor control and communication disabilities to participate in employment.

Why does this study matter?

This research will help improve access to employment opportunities for people with motor control and communication disabilities.

What are the key findings?

  • Assistive communication devices improve the quality of life of people with disabilities. They also increase the participation of these individuals. Such devices can help in all areas of life, such as education, employment, and social participation.
  • Designing communication tools is complicated; it requires the participation of the people who will use them.
  • The application process for accessing assistive communication systems and programs must be clear and barrier-free.
  • The people who will use the communication tool must be trained. Their family members, employers, and employees must also receive training.

“Each person has the right to a voice of their own and a right to be heard.”

If you would like a full copy of the report, please email us.

Understanding User Perspectives of the Speed, Accuracy, and Delay Trade-off for Captioning Fast-Paced Media Content

Understanding User Perspectives of the Speed, Accuracy, and Delay Trade-off for Captioning Fast-Paced Media Content

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading the research?

Ryerson University

What is the goal of this study?

This study will determine user preferences for live captioning of fast-paced live media. This will be based on feedback from the deaf and hard-of-hearing community.

Why does this study matter?

Engagement with user groups is essential. This is needed to ensure that live captioning meets the needs of the deaf and hard-of-hearing community.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

A Study of Accessible and Inclusive Virtual and Blended Service Provision Models for the Federal Public Service and Federally Regulated Industries in Post-COVID-19 Canada

A Study of Accessible and Inclusive Virtual and Blended Service Provision Models for the Federal Public Service and Federally Regulated Industries in Post-COVID-19 Canada

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading the research?

University of Ontario Institute of Technology

What is the goal of this study?

This study will develop recommendations on service provision models for the federal public service. These will also be aimed at federally regulated industries. The goal is to ensure the services these bodies provide are accessible to people with sensory and cognitive disabilities.

Why does this study matter?

People with sensory and cognitive disabilities need improved access to services.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Towards Better Accessibility in Communications: Identifying the Barriers Faced by People with Aphasia in Financial Institutions

Towards Better Accessibility in Communications: Identifying the Barriers Faced by People with Aphasia in Financial Institutions

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading the research?

Association des personnes intéressées à l’aphasie et a l’accident vasculaire cérébral

What is the goal of this study?

People with aphasia and other communication disabilities experience barriers when accessing banking services. This includes services provided by staff and when using banking machines. The goal is to identify these barriers and how to remove them.

Why does this study matter?

Banking services need to be accessible to people with communication disabilities.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Accessible and Explainable Artificial Intelligence in Decision-Making

Accessible and Explainable Artificial Intelligence in Decision-Making

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading the research?

Canadian National Institute for the Blind

What is the goal of this study?

This study will develop best practices. The goal is to integrate accessibility considerations when making decisions related to artificial intelligence.

Why does this study matter?

Decisions are increasingly being made based on artificial intelligence. The impact of this on people with disabilities needs to be studied. This will ensure that everyone is treated equally.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Quiet waves: Seeing Communication Barriers in Inclusive Design

Quiet waves: Seeing Communication Barriers in Inclusive Design

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading the research?

Canadian Association of the Deaf

What is the goal of this study?

This study will identify best practices in communication that help remove barriers faced by the Deaf community. It will also include a review of technology-based solutions. This review will look at both policy-based and cost-sharing solutions.

Why does this study matter?

People who are Deaf and use sign language must have equitable access to communication. This will enable them to connect with others wherever they go.  

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Responsible Conduct of Research Through an Accessibility and Inclusion Lens

Responsible Conduct of Research Through an Accessibility and Inclusion Lens

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading the research?

Canadian National Institute for the Blind

What is the goal of this study?

This study will identify barriers to accessible and inclusive research. It will also propose guidelines and best practices to prevent such barriers or reduce their impact. This will include recommendations for making research tools and software more accessible.

Why does this study matter?

More people with disabilities need to be involved in research, both as participants and researchers. The lived experience of people with disabilities is important to understanding barriers and improving accessibility research.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Barrier-Free: A Study of Gaps and Best Practices in Information and Communication Technology Accessibility Solutions

Go Barrier-Free: A Study of Gaps and Best Practices in Information and Communication Technology Accessibility Solutions

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

New Brunswick Community College

What is the goal of this study?

This research will support accessibility standards for information and communication technologies. The work will include assessing these technologies, identifying gaps in accessibility, and making recommendations. The study will also explore how these technologies can improve accessibility within the built environment and transportation.

Why does this study matter?

Information and communication technologies are essential to our everyday lives. They need to be accessible to all Canadians.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Accessible Canada, Accessible World: Co-creating a Global Standards Community

Accessible Canada, Accessible World: Co-creating a Global Standards Community

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

Inclusive Design Research Centre - Ontario College of Art and Design University

What is the goal of this study?

This project will build resources for research informed by the experience of people with disabilities. These resources will be created through in-person and online events. 

Why does this study matter?

Including the lived experience and expertise of people with disabilities allows for a more inclusive approach to accessibility. Increased accessibility can be achieved when the people who face barriers are included in the research and standards development process.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Developing Principles, Guidance, and Good Practices for Community-Based Emancipatory Research on Accessibility Standards

Developing Principles, Guidance, and Good Practices for Community-Based Emancipatory Research on Accessibility Standards

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

Council of Canadians with Disabilities

What is the goal of this study?

This study will identify how to add the voices and lived experience of people with disabilities to community-based research. This includes the experiences of those who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

Why does this study matter?

The lived experience of people with disabilities is important to research. In the past, disability-related research has been “about” disability; it has not focused on the thoughts or experiences of people with disabilities. Including the perspectives of people with disabilities will inform research.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Enabling Independence: Assessing Activities of Daily Living to Inform Safety Standards for Built Environments

Enabling Independence: Assessing Activities of Daily Living to Inform Safety Standards for Built Environments

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

Carleton University

What is the goal of this study?

This study will create a set of best practices for integrating technology into built environments, such as buildings and other structures. This will help people with disabilities be more independent.

Why does this study matter?

Built environments that support independence can improve the quality of life of people with disabilities. It can also increase their participation in the community.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Accessibility of Canadian Emergency Alerts: Study of Unmet Needs

Accessibility of Canadian Emergency Alerts: Study of Unmet Needs

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

Neil Squire Society

What is the goal of this study?

This study will look at ways to make emergency alert systems in Canada accessible to people with disabilities.

Why does this study matter?

All Canadians need to receive emergency alerts at the same time. In some cases, a person with a disability may need more time and resources to respond to an emergency.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Creating Inclusive Employment: Empowering Youth with Disabilities Through Inclusive, Accessible Skills Development

Creating Inclusive Employment: Empowering Youth with Disabilities Through Inclusive, Accessible Skills Development

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

March of Dimes Canada

What is the goal of this study?

Youth with disabilities need support to access employment. This study will focus on understanding how to better provide this support. 

Why does this study matter?

Youth with disabilities may experience increased barriers as they transition from school to work. By removing barriers, these youth will have a better chance to make this transition successfully.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Brain Injury and Accessibility of the Electoral Process in Canada

Brain Injury and Accessibility of the Electoral Process in Canada

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

Brain Injury Canada

What is the goal of this study?

People with brain injuries experience barriers to participating in election-related activities. This study will identify ways to remove and prevent these barriers.

Why does this study matter?

Every Canadian has the right to vote and be involved in the electoral process.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Regulating the Digital Domain

Regulating the Digital Domain

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

Inclusive Design Research Centre - Ontario College of Art and Design University

What is the goal of this study?

This study will research the barriers that prevent people with disabilities from accessing digital technology and resources.

Why does this study matter?

Technology is part of our everyday lives. Equal access to technology allows people with disabilities to experience the same benefits and supports as everyone else.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Virtual Communication Project

Virtual Communication Project

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

Wavefront Centre for Communication Accessibility

What is the goal of this study?

This study will identify the factors that make it harder or easier for people who are Deaf, Hard of Hearing, or Deaf/Blind to communicate. This includes communication that takes place in person, virtually (online), or both (hybrid environment).

Why does this study matter?

Communication is essential for all Canadians, including people who are Deaf, Hard of Hearing, or Deaf/Blind. Being able to communicate enables them to participate meaningfully in society.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Ensuring access and understanding of public information for people with disabilities

Ensuring access and understanding of public information for people with disabilities

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

Université du Québec à Rimouski

What is the goal of this study?

People with disabilities face barriers to accessing and understanding online information. This study will focus on the barriers that hinder access to legal and communication services online. It will assess best practices and recommend ways to develop the next generation of model accessibility standards as they relate to communication and technology.

Why does this study matter?

Governments have a responsibility to communicate with all Canadians. They must also ensure equitable access to information.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Advancing Accessibility Standards through Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit

Advancing Accessibility Standards through Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

Nunavummi Disabilities Makinnasuaqtiit Society

What is the goal of this study?

This study will gather information on how accessibility standards are used in Nunavut. It will identify barriers faced by people with disabilities from an Indigenous perspective.

Why does this study matter?

A better understanding of Indigenous perspectives on disability and accessibility is needed. This will make future standards more relevant to Indigenous communities.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

Accessibility Futurisms: Analyzing Access through a Disability Justice Modality

Accessibility Futurisms: Analyzing Access through a Disability Justice Modality

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

The Youth Project Society of Nova Scotia

What is the goal of this study?

A disability justice framework centres the experiences of excluded groups. This study will explore the intersecting experiences of young 2SLGBTQIA+ people with disabilities. It will study the increased barriers they may face in their communities. The study will include recommendations to increase accessibility. These will focus on buildings, outdoor spaces, programs and services, communication, and transportation.

Why does this study matter?

Everyone deserves equal access and support within their community.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.

New completed reports

Visualizing Accessibility Standards: A Demonstration with CSA B651

Visualizing Accessibility Standards: A Demonstration with CSA B651

This research project is completed.

Who is leading the research?

Dalhousie University

What is the goal of this study?

Visual reference materials and tools can be helpful for presenting technical documentation. This study will look at different methods of visual communication and how such methods can make it easier to apply accessibility standards.

Why does this study matter?

Using visual aids to present technical information can improve information sharing. It can also increase understanding for all stakeholders.

What are the key findings?

  • Those responsible for applying the technical aspects of a standard need to understand the standard’s design specifications, including their purpose and function. 
  • Adding visual aids and a written explanation to a standard can make this easier. For example, three-dimensional (3D) models can show spaces from different angles and perspectives. This can help explain why a standard is important and which barriers it addresses.
  • Visual aids can also explain the concept of “mind-friendly” environments. These are spaces that are designed to support neurodivergent people. Factors such as strong smells, the way that sound echoes, or how busy or quiet a space is can affect this aspect of an environment.

“Visual aids help the reader understand, especially since not everyone feels prepared to interpret and apply accessibility standards accurately.”

If you would like a full copy of the report, 

please email us.

New projects

Investigating the Development of Accessibility Standards in Canada and the Inclusion/Exclusion of Episodic Disabilities

Investigating the Development of Accessibility Standards in Canada and the Inclusion/Exclusion of Episodic Disabilities

This research project is still underway.

Who is leading this research?

Realize

What is the goal of this study?

Some disabilities come and go. These are known as episodic disabilities. This study will look at how accessibility standards can address the barriers faced by people with episodic disabilities.

Why does this study matter?

Most people think of disabilities as visible, permanent, and unchanging. Episodic disabilities challenge that belief.

There is a need for more focused action to address a broader range of conditions. Increasing our understanding of the types of episodic disabilities will help spur such action.

What are the key findings?

Key findings will be shared once the research is completed.